Result of Queer As Folk Youtube

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Queer Eye
Queer Eye
8.8
Queer Eye
8.8

An all-new “Fab Five” advise men on fashion, grooming, food, culture and design in this modern reboot of the Emmy Award-winning reality series.

Queer As Folk
Queer As Folk
8.0
Queer As Folk
8.0

Brash humor and genuine emotion make up this original series revolving around the lives, loves, ambitions, careers and friendships of a group of gay men and women living on Liberty Avenue in contemporary Pittsburgh, PA. The show offers an unapologetic look at modern, urban gay and lesbian lives while addressing the most critical health and political issues affecting the community. Sometimes racy, sometimes sensitive and always straight to the heart.

Queer as Folk
Queer as Folk
8.3
Queer as Folk
8.3

Queer as Folk is a 1999 British television series that chronicles the lives of three gay men living in Manchester's gay village around Canal Street. Both Queer as Folk and Queer as Folk 2 were written by Russell T Davies. The first series was re-shown on More 4 between 14 and 18 October 2007, as part of Channel 4's 25th-birthday celebrations. Queer as Folk was produced by the Red Production Company for Channel 4. The title of the programme comes from a dialect expression from some parts of Northern England, "there's nowt so queer as folk", meaning "there's nothing as strange as people"; which is a word play the modern day English synonym of "queer", meaning homosexual. Davies had originally titled the series this, although at the suggestion of Channel 4 executives for a period during its development and pre-production it was known as Queer as Fuck, before it reverted to the former name.

Queer Duck
Queer Duck
3.0
Queer Duck
3.0

Queer Duck is an animated series produced by Mondo that originally appeared on Icebox.com and later moved to the American cable television channel Showtime in 2002, where it aired as a follow-up feature of the American version of Queer as Folk. Although far from being the first gay cartoon character, Queer Duck was the first animated TV series to have homosexuality as its predominant theme. Like several later television cartoons, Queer Duck was animated in Macromedia Flash. The show was created, written and executive produced by Mike Reiss, executive producer of network cartoons The Simpsons and The Critic. The animation was directed and designed by Xeth Feinberg. The theme song for the cartoon was performed by the drag-queen celebrity, RuPaul. Despite the suggestive content, there is no graphic language or any sexual content, but the latter is heavily implied throughout the series and the movie.

Queer Britain
Queer Britain
0.0
Queer Britain
0.0

Presented by YouTuber and journalist Riyadh Khalaf, Queer Britain gets under the skin of queer culture and shines a light on the challenges faced by the LGBTQ+ community.

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy
Queer Eye for the Straight Guy
5.7
Queer Eye for the Straight Guy
5.7

Queer Eye is an American reality television series that premiered on the Bravo cable television network in July 2003. The program's name was changed from Queer Eye for the Straight Guy after the third season to broaden the scope of its content. The series was created by executive producers David Collins and Michael Williams along with their producing partner David Metzler; it was produced by their production company, Scout Productions. The show is premised on and plays with the stereotypes that gay men are superior in matters of fashion, style, personal grooming, interior design and culture. In each episode, the team of five gay men known collectively as the "Fab Five" perform a makeover on a person, usually a straight man, revamping his wardrobe, redecorating his home and offering advice on grooming, lifestyle and food. Queer Eye for the Straight Guy debuted in 2003, and quickly became both a surprise hit and one of the most talked-about television programs of the year. The success of the show led to merchandising, franchising of the concept internationally, and a woman-oriented spin-off, Queer Eye for the Straight Girl. Queer Eye won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Reality Program in 2004. The show's name was shortened to Queer Eye at the beginning of its third season to reflect the show's change in direction from making over only straight men to including women and gay men. Queer Eye ended production in June 2006 and the final ten episodes aired in October 2007. The series ended October 30. In September 2008, the Fine Living Network briefly aired Queer Eye in syndication.

A Queer Try
A Queer Try
0.0
A Queer Try
0.0
Queer Eye for the Straight Girl
Queer Eye for the Straight Girl
0.0
Queer Eye for the Straight Girl
0.0

Queer Eye for the Straight Girl is a spin-off of the television show Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. Straight Girl aired from January to May 2005. As the name suggests, the program focuses on makeovers for women while following the format of the original show. As opposed to the original show, which is mostly set in New York City, Queer Eye for the Straight Girl is set in Los Angeles. The hosts are called "The Gal Pals" and include three gay men and a lesbian. The show was unsuccessful and ended after the first season.

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy (UK)
Queer Eye for the Straight Guy (UK)
0.0
Queer Eye for the Straight Guy (UK)
0.0
Aussie Queer Eye for the Straight Guy
Aussie Queer Eye for the Straight Guy
0.0
Aussie Queer Eye for the Straight Guy
0.0

Aussie Queer Eye for the Straight Guy was an Australian reality television series that was based on the original and hugely popular American series, Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. Much like the American version, the program is premised on the stereotype that gay men are superior in matters of fashion, style, personal grooming, interior design and culture. In each episode, a team of five gay men—known collectively as the "Fab Five"—perform a makeover on a subject, usually a straight man, revamping his wardrobe, redecorating his home and offering advice on grooming, lifestyle and food. The program premiered on Network Ten at 7:30 pm on Wednesday 9 February 2005, during the first week the 2005 Australian ratings season to a national audience of 903,254. After the second episode saw its audience share drop 20 per cent to 725,263, rumours began the show would now be moved from its prime time slot at 7.30 pm on Wednesdays to 9.30 pm on Mondays. However, after the third episode which aired on 23 February, the Network axed the program. The three remaining episodes aired later in the year.

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy: Carson's Style
Queer Eye for the Straight Guy: Carson's Style
0.0
Queer Eye for the Straight Guy: Carson's Style
0.0
Queer Edge with Jack E. Jett & Sandra Bernhard
Queer Edge with Jack E. Jett & Sandra Bernhard
0.0
Queer Edge with Jack E. Jett & Sandra Bernhard
0.0
Queers.
Queers.
8.5
Queers.
8.5

A series of eight monologues set in the same pub over many years of gay history in response to the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act.

QueerTV
QueerTV
0.0
QueerTV
0.0

QueerTV is a syndicated Australian television series produced by Panda Media, created and directed by Chris Reynolds and Pandora Box. In 2003, the show is now running into its tenth season in Australia. It appears on Television Sydney and Aurora Community Channel on the Foxtel, Austar and Optus Digital Networks and is also soild around the world. Pandora Box was a reporter for DV8TV on Channel 31 producing eight segments that ran for 5 minutes an episode. With the end of DV8 Chris and Pandora created QueerTV. The QueerTV crew have filmed and reported on the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras for the past 4 years. The line up of presenters and reporters include Pandora Box, Jo Smith, Sexy Galexy, Goldie MacShift, Aaron Harkness, Ricki Renee, BovaGirl, Glen Upton and Matt Taylor.

Raised by Queers
Raised by Queers
0.0
Raised by Queers
0.0

Actor and gay dad Kieron Richardson explores same-sex parenting and introduces his twins

QT: QueerTelevision
QT: QueerTelevision
0.0
QT: QueerTelevision
0.0

QT: QueerTelevision was a Canadian television newsmagazine series, which aired on Citytv and CablePulse 24 in the late 1990s. Focusing on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues, the series was hosted by Irshad Manji. In addition to coverage of general LGBT issues in Canada, the show was one of the venues where she developed some of her early ideas about the reform of Islam. The series began in 1997 on CablePulse 24 as The Q Files. It changed its name to QT: QueerTelevision in 1998 when it was added to Citytv's schedule, to fit in with that channel's other news and information series such as FashionTelevision, Breakfast Television and MediaTelevision. The series ended in 2001. The series was also broadcast via streaming video on the LGBT website PlanetOut.

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